Sunday, August 2, 2015

City Views, Country Dreams

Good afternoon from New York.

Humid late July days were punctuated by a very wet Thursday, resulting in almost two inches of rainfall.  We had our Blue Full Moon on the 31st.  (I forgot to look for it when on my way home from a late shift at work.)

So far August weather has been warm, but has contained lower humidity than that of July.  I am grateful, and decided to walk across Central Park today.


Just outside my building, I spied masses of red begonias, a gleaming bike, a shiny white van, an American flag and several black cars.  I hoped to be able to cling to any available shade.


Reaching the West 72nd Street entrance to Central Park, I avoided eye contact with assembled pedicab chaps who took me for a tourist because I was taking photographs.


I also moved quickly through the shady Strawberry Fields area, trying not to hear the off-key performance of Beatles tunes that seemed to please other folks.


From the above photograph you can see just how clear the sky was.  If you look very carefully between the twin evergreen trees in the background, you can the top spire of the Empire State Building, located about two miles downtown.

I couldn't resist taking a photograph of some of the horse drawn carriages clip clopping along the park roadways.


I began to notice lots of brown, fallen leaves along the lawns.  It seems too early for spying these signs of autumn, but there they are.


As I gazed upwards, i saw quite a few nests newly revealed as leaves begin to fall.


This roadway has a curving incline that was proving a challenge for many weekend cyclists.  I just kept on walking along at a slow and easy pace.


These eye catching banners are hung throughout the Park to promote the Central Park Conservancy.  I thought it odd that the electric light was on at midday.


Lacy shadows caught my eye.  I also saw lots of acorns that had already been nibbled by squirrels, but saw no squirrels.


I took the following photograph to indicate the vast contrast between the shadowy areas and those in bright sunshine.


More shady leafy areas are apparent in the following photograph.


I believe that these flowers are a sort of impatiens, and were clearly loving the sunlight.  I'd thought that impatiens plants could also tolerate more gentle light.


I continue to somewhat fascinated by the types of signage that is placed around the Park.  Is it curious that this sign was limited to three languages?


As I left the Park and crossed Fifth Avenue, I had a peek at the below street level garden on the side of the opulent Ukrainian Institute.


A bit farther along East 79th Street, I noticed that this neatly trimmed box has a brave little weed sharing its space.  Perhaps none of the millionaires living in the building mind.  Or perhaps they are all away somewhere on holiday.


Since most of the pictures in this post are dominated by shades of green, I thought I would conclude this report of my sunny Sunday walk with these city views of two glorious planters.


These are just some of the beauties planted at the entrance way to the Greek Archdiocese building.  The plants and flowers are always very beautiful at the this address.


My destination today was once again The New York Society Library, where I picked up three books.  They are Milan Kundera's short story collection, The Festival of Insignificance; Zen Training by Katsuki Sekida; and Robert Macfarlane's The Old Ways.  I am about half-way through Mr. Macfarlane's Landmarks and want to pursue more of his writing.

I realize that a walk through Central Park is very far from a walk down a country lane, or through an old forest.  However, I am very grateful to have the Park nearby.  I am also very appreciative of all your visits and comments.

Best wishes to you all for more enjoyable summer days, whatever sort of weather may arrive.

34 comments:

  1. Always pleasure to go on walks with you.

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    1. Thanks so much! It's grand to have you along. xo

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  2. There's pleasure to be found in walks of all kinds and when in the city it pays to take time and really look. Most often we seem to concentrate at eye level - but above street level often shows details of buildings that have been left alone by developers making attractive shop fronts and offices.

    I enjoy your walks through the park - great sense of space.

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    1. I do agree with you about the pleasure of walking. There's something about taking time to have that bit of exercise...of legs and eyes and mind. I find that many thoughts arise during my walks, summoned by some mysterious connection made by my mind from what I am seeing along my route.

      Thank you for your kind words. xo

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  3. I think New Yorkers are jolly lucky to have Central Park in their midst - such a haven of quiet.
    Glad you are enjoying 'Landmarks' - excellent book.

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    1. Oh we are very, very lucky. I cannot imagine living in this pulsing city without Central Park. As I was walking along a Park pathway yesterday, I was struck by the relative quiet, even though quite a bit was going on.

      Landmarks is wonderful! xo

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  4. Good for you, Frances!
    A lovely walk.
    Hoping to see you this week.

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    1. Yes, Elizabeth. Let's hope that the humidity does go up again. It's great to have a break from that challenge. My longish walk was really enjoyable.

      See you soon. xo

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  5. I laughed at the thought of you scooting past those off-key Beatle tunes! We've had a traumatic time and miserable, miserable weather so I particularly enjoyed catching up with your last two posts and seeing NYC through your artistic, intelligent, enquiring eyes once again. Cx

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    1. Chris, I am glad that sharing my walk across the Park brought you some enjoyment. What a time you and your family have been going through. Hoping that the coming weeks will bring good developments. xo

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  6. Unfortunately our 'country lane' is used by many lorries and cars who's drivers don't seem to be able to match the 40mph on the speed signs to the speed of their cars/lorries. You walk along it at your peril so a lovely walk around Central Park is just what the doctor ordered...........thank you so much.
    By this time next year I will be just a few weeks away from doing the walk myself.......bliss.
    Sheila (UK)

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    1. Thanks for your visit and comment Sheila. Sometimes I might just have a romanticized view of country lanes! Hoping that this time next year you will have a fabulous New York visit.

      Best wishes.

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  7. Oh Frances, just loved going on that walk with you. City folk know the wisdom that us country folk don't. I was in Rome and the gypsies drove us crazy (all over Italy) and I simply cannot be rude to anyone. Then, a taxi driver at the train station told us (with gypsies hovering around in our faces) "do not make eye contact with them." Who knew? Not this country mouse.

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    1. Donna, I could identify with your comment. I also do not like being rude, and certainly try to abide by the Golden Rude. However, there are certain situations when it's also wise to protect one's own space. xo

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  8. Yes, you are lucky to live near Central Park and always have fresh impressions of how seasons come, reign and leave...
    Beautiful photos - the green has so many nuances!

    Happy reading, Frances!:)

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    1. It's funny Rossichka, although I must have walked in the Park thousands of times over the many years I've been in the city, it still always greets me with fresh experiences.

      Aren't those greens amazing?

      xo

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  9. A walk through Central Park looks pretty fascinating to me! A walk along an English country lane at the moment is no particular pleasure as the councils cut the verges back to nothing, wrecking all the wild flowers and the hedges which I find incredibly distressing. leaving behind a brown desert.

    I love it that you take the trouble to record your surroundings when so many people take their own environment so much for granted.

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    1. Marianne, it's a shame about the country lane verges being so trimmed back. Isn't there a tool called a strimmer?

      It is my pleasure to show a bit of what I love about New York City to folks who cannot actually be here.

      xo

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  10. We can see the seasons change through your photographs. Your love of walking in green spaces is shared by many city dwellers here in the UK too. I am not sure if you can see this link about a proposal to make the City of London into a National Park in an attempt to save its wildlife. http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150731-how-a-city-can-save-wildlife

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    1. Val, thanks for sharing this link. It is a very interesting proposal. I want to return to the site to have a more careful read of the BBC article. I can't imagine a similar proposal getting very far here in NYC, but you never know. xo

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  11. Frances, Actually, I think a walk through your park seems just as lovely as a walk down a country road. I am glad it is within easy distance for you since you are a lover of gardens and nature. Here in the Southeast, our leaves seem to be drifting downward sooner that usual, as well. I keep thinking, "Slow down, it is only August!" Your pics are great, as always.

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    1. Yes, Jeri, having the beautiful park so nearby is a true luxury. Since last winter went on for so long, I was hoping that we might also be treated to a longer stretch of green leaf days. Ahh well.

      Thanks so much for your comment. xo

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  12. I always enjoy visiting the Park with you, as well as strolling the streets.

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    1. Vicki, it's always such a pleasure to see what's going on in your neck of the woods. Fun to be able to trade neighborhoods for a while via the screen. I do think blogs can expand our understanding of other parts of the world.

      xo

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    2. Armchair travel at its best!

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    3. I sm right on that page with you, Vicki. xo

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  13. Yes I forgot to look for the Blue Moon too Frances. I wonder if any of those nests incorporate bits of your yarn.\
    We recently crawled along a country lane at 5mph behind huge farm machinery for 30 minutes. It was very frustrating! Better to stroll round Central Park taking lovely pictures at your own pace I think.

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    1. Lucille, I do like to imagine some of my yarn being part of some of those tree-homes.

      Oooh, I don't envy your being slowed down behind the farm vehicle for so long. I've had that sort of experience myself as a child in Virginia, and also when visiting with UK friends. It's the other side of those narrow, picturesque roadways. I do prefer walking at a pace I call my own...even on a city sidewalk.

      I loved your cliff post! xo

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  14. A lovely walk through Central Park. It is always a pleasure to join you!

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  15. Oh thank you very much, Gina. There are so many different parts of the Park...lots more areas that I don't think I've yet shown in my posts. I do enjoy having your company along for these walks! xo

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  16. Lovely walk with you Frances,
    but what about that Summer ice cream cone?
    soon it will be too late :((
    Waiting...

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  17. Wasn't it Chryssie Hynde that sang, "maybe tomorrow" ... I almost opted for a cone this afternoon, but the sky suddenly turned stormy and I decided to wait.

    Promise you Carol, I will report that initial scoop to you.

    xo

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  18. A lovely walk in the park Frances...
    Have asunny week, take care!

    Titti

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    1. Titti, that particular afternoon was just perfect for a long walk. Some of our recent sunny days have just been too hot to encourage much exercise. (Making me a bit of a lazybones.)

      xo

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